18 responses to “Novice freelancers, instead of Helium, try hyperlocal”

  1. Walter L. Johnson II

    Good article. It’s a good example of hyperlocal being more than just covering a particular city, town, or even suburb, or at least a certain neighborhood within such a community. It’s also covering certain topics within such markets. Still, it’ll be interesting to see how such a business model will be monetized. Any thoughts out there?

  2. Lyrehca

    quick note–looks like it’s Hopkinsville, Kentucky, not Massachusetts.

  3. Tracy from West Seattle Blog

    Actually I would beg to differ. We pay freelancers a lot more than they’d make — at least as I understand it — from those “content aggregators.” Unless they’re making more than $100 for the average story, in which case I stand corrected. We pay $50-$100 for assigned professional freelance-reported/photographed stories.

  4. Betsy Richter

    As the owner/operator of OurPDX.com, I can safely say that we’re not paying freelancers at all right now. Instead, we’re a ‘cashflow-negative’ operation, with all of the cash currently flowing *out* of my pockets.

    All of our authors know this going in, of course, and we’ve been fairly transparent about the site’s goals, aspirations, and operations.

    And in return for paying our authors, um, nothing, well – we don’t have quotas (you write when the spirit moves you.) And we do at least spring for food at our monthly author/reader gatherings (yet another reason why we’re cashflow-negative…)

  5. 2nd Annual WordCount Blogathon « WordCount – Freelancing in the Digital Age

    […] catch the debate going on over the pros and cons of writing for content aggregators – and a nifty idea for an alternative.  I’m currently hosting the 2nd Annual WordCount Blogathon, where 40-plus writers are […]

  6. Welcome to WordCount « WordCount – Freelancing in the Digital Age

    […] catch the debate going on over the pros and cons of writing for content aggregators – and a nifty idea for an alternative.  I’m currently hosting the 2nd Annual WordCount Blogathon, where 40-plus writers are […]

  7. kmcdade

    I’ve got a cash-flow-negative hyperlocal site, too — http://parkrosegateway.com. It’s actually part of the Neighborlogs beta (http://neighborlogs.com). The idea is to get local advertisers to bring in revenue, and eventually do profit-sharing with contributers. I haven’t gotten that far yet, though (in fact, I’ve been rather neglectful), because I’m doing it on a very part time basis.

  8. Barbara Whitlock

    A way to gain extra traction with the same article for a local newspaper or website is to also publish the same article in Helium’s Local Guides channel: http://www.helium.com/channels/136252-Local-Guides

    Helium’s newspaper partners pay stock content — $5 to $20 per article — for one-time, non-exclusive use in print.

    Barbara

  9. Weekend reading 30/05 » Without An Apostrophe

    […] Choose hyperlocal over content sites – For my fellow writers, a good piece from the WordCount blog on choosing to write for hyperlocal news sites instead of content sites (or as I like to call them, dumping grounds.) […]

  10. Writer games Examiner.com to make a point about content aggregators « WordCount – Freelancing in the Digital Age

    […] Here at WordCount, there’s been a similar exchange of opinions on the value of writing for content aggregators recently. In a post and multiple follow up comments, a Helium representative explained the site’s editorial process and how much money writers can make. Several freelancers countered her with arguments explaining why they won’t write for content aggregators or why they did and wouldn’t again. I even chimed in with my own advice to write for a hyperlocal news site instead. […]

  11. The business case for a writers’ blogathon « WordCount – Freelancing in the Digital Age

    […] for, at HuffPost to drive traffic to our other work, ourselves to promote a book or project, a hyperlocal news site, or ghostblogging for a corporate […]

  12. Why writers should blog: it’s not personal, it’s business « WordCount – Freelancing in the Digital Age

    […] for, at HuffPost to drive traffic to our other work, ourselves to promote a book or project, a hyperlocal news site, or ghostblogging for a corporate […]

  13. Announcing a hyperlocal news how-to at Portland Digital Journalism Camp « WordCount – Freelancing in the Digital Age

    […] writers who were thinking of working for content sites like Helium.com or Demand Studios to take a stab at hyperlocal news […]

  14. DDD

    Personally as an espiring writer any exposure is better than having your thoughts bottled up or disappearing on paper from trying to find the right company to mail out your writings hence the word (NONE). The different styles from each company is beneficial to the different styles of the writers.
    One style (size) does not fit all! The key factor is compensation, whether for cash or experience the details for each up front. Instead of the “read the book (buy the book)” situation. While conducting my research on the different sites many of them do not list the compensation details up front.