14 responses to “9 tips for squeezing more out of a writers’ conference”

  1. Dina Santorelli

    Great tips here, Michelle! Thanks for posting!

  2. Cathie Ericson

    Love the “it’s that good!” on why you can’t share. I have never attended a writers’ conference, but this piece certainly piqued my interest!

    I have attended a number of conferences on behalf of clients, though, and agree 100% with the networking. Everyone is there to meet others, so it is easy and spontaneous.

  3. Parveen Talpur

    Great tips for a novice like me. Will try to meet you at the conference.

  4. EditFish » Weekend reading

    […] the NMAs, the KRWs, the CSME awards and the PWAC AGM and awards). I like Michelle Rafter’s advice about getting the most out of writers’ conferences (and other […]

  5. How to Make the Most out of a Conference or Expo | My Creative Directory

    […] Take advantage of the mixers offered at the event you are attending. It’s a great way to network with new people while catching up with those you already know. But if you spend the entire time surrounding yourself with the same people, you are limiting your reach. Remember—you are there to learn and network! Networking is a big part of going to a conference. Talk to people you don’t know. I met a retired women’s magazine editor at one of the cocktail parties at last year’s ASJA conference who gave me the best piece of advice I got at the entire conference (sorry, I can’t share – it’s that good). —Michelle Rafter […]

  6. How to Make the Most out of a Conference or Expo | Payrp.com

    […] Take advantage of the mixers offered at the event you are attending. It’s a great way to network with new people while catching up with those you already know. But if you spend the entire time surrounding yourself with the same people, you are limiting your reach. Remember—you are there to learn and network! Networking is a big part of going to a conference. Talk to people you don’t know. I met a retired women’s magazine editor at one of the cocktail parties at last year’s ASJA conference who gave me the best piece of advice I got at the entire conference (sorry, I can’t share – it’s that good). —Michelle Rafter […]

  7. Jane Davidson

    Great advice here. I wrote one of my best pieces of descriptive journalism after attending a CAJ conference years ago. One of the speakers was brilliant at using the technique of interviewing a subject in depth. When I came home I used what I’d learned from him, and what a difference it made to my writing! And I agree that it’s more comfortable to chat with people you know. Fortunately I knew almost no-one so I *had* to network.

  8. Weekend reading | Where in the World?

    […] the NMAs, the KRWs, the CSME awards and the PWAC AGM and awards). I like Michelle Rafter’s advice about getting the most out of writers’ conferences (and other […]

  9. OCW Conference: Eureka! « Keli Wright's Open-Faced Sandwich

    […] posted on Chip MacGregor’s blog that is very worthwhile reading.  (Part I   Part II)   Michelle Rafter offers 8 tips, the majority of which focus on the all-important networking aspect.  […]

  10. Susan Johnston

    Great tips, Michelle! Hope you have a productive time at the conference. I got a back-up iPhone battery for Christmas and it was a huge help at the last conference I attempted. You charge it in advance and then when you’re at the conference or just out and about, you can get up to two iPhone or iPad charges by plugging in your device to the battery rather than a wall outlet. It’s great when you don’t have a wall outlet handy and I’ve let other people at conferences charge their devices (when they’re sitting nearby), which everyone appreciates.

  11. Cynthia Rosi

    Loving ASJA. Hope we bump into each other Michelle!

  12. Linda Adams

    I’ve run the pitch sessions at a local writers conference since about 2007. A huge turn-off is the writers who try to get over the system. We had a writer who came into the room to try to see an agent. He pointed to one who was sitting alone and said, “Why can’t I see her? She’s not with anyone.” “She’s on break,” we told him. “You need to leave.” He told us he had a pitch session in the next round, so why couldn’t he stay. We made him leave. He’d lied about having the next session — it was obviously a ploy to see if he could sneak past us. Trust me, when you do stuff like that, everyone remembers you and not in a good way.

  13. Estelle Erasmus

    I was at the members session for the ASJA2013 meeting. I really enjoyed seeing old colleagues and meeting new friends. Got great info on new outlets and went through my business cards fairly quickly. Thanks for the post and sharing what you learned (except the part about the retired editor).
    Estelle

  14. EP

    That sounds like a whole lot of fun! I mean work, too, of course. Interesting insights.