14 responses to “Promote your writing business through your email signature”

  1. 10 Ways to Promote Your Freelance Writing « WordCount/by Michelle Vranizan Rafter

    [...] 1. Use your email signature. In addition to listing basic contact information, an email signature can point people to your Website, blog, newest book and anything else you want them to know about you. Learn more in this post about using an email signature. [...]

  2. Vera Marie Badertscher

    Since I am mostly approaching magazines, I list a variety of recent publications. Here is the whole thing:
    Vera Marie Badertscher
    P.O. Box XXXX
    XX,XX XXXXX
    xxx-xxx-xxxx
    http://www.pen4hire.com
    http://www.linkedin.com/in/verambadertscher

    Vera Marie Badertscher is winner of 2007 and 2006 National Federation of Press Women’s First Place National Awards for Travel Articles. Complete writer information at http://www.pen4hire.com

    A sample of recently published articles:
    Your Footprint in the City and Virtuous Vacations, Both articles in Rolls Royce Owner’s Club Desk Diary 2008;
    The Piano on the Beach and Surprising Nashville; Both articles in Steinway & Sons Magazine, 12/07;
    BICAS, 12/07, Tucson Guide ;
    Boys Will Be Boys (essay on Hawk), 10/07; On the Comeback Trail, 9/07, Arizona Highways ;
    The Great Unknown, (Le Marche Italy), 7/07; Jamestown’s 400th Anniversary, 3/07, Home & Away Hoosier ;
    Atlantic Coast Historic Road Trip, 5/07, AAA Living, ;
    Richmond Holocaust Museum, 3/07, Arizona Jewish Post ;
    Secrets of Le Marche, 1/07, Rolls Royce Owner’s Desk Diary,
    Quincy Tahoma of Santa Fe, 5/06, American Indian Art Magazine .

    Web articles include The du Ponts’ Place in the Country, AutomotiveTraveler.com; Acoma Pueblo, Pueblo Cultural Museum, giftedtravel.com; Titan Missile Museum for Arizona Highways.

    Member of National Federation of Press Women and Society of SW Authors
    Work in progress, with Charnell Havens: Quincy Tahoma: The Final Chapter. See information at http://tahoma.info
    In the interest of the environment, please think twice before printing this e-mail.
    This e-mail and the information it contains is confidential. If you have received this e-mail in error please notify the sender immediately. You should not copy it for any purpose, or disclose its contents to any other person.

  3. Susan

    Michelle, I wanted you to know that after reader this post, I decided to update my email signature. :)

    I did want to pose the question… how long do you think is a reasonable length? I think a short signature can be effective, too.

  4. Michelle Rafter

    Well, if you looked through the comments that came in on this post, you’ll see that length is all over the map. My email sig is pretty minimal and I like it that way, but as you can see from Vera Marie’s example, some sigs are almost entire resumes. Whatever you use, I think it’s a good idea to tweak it every so often to keep it fresh.

    Michelle R.

  5. Kathy Sena

    Michelle, I love your idea for having different e-mail sigs for different audiences.

    I do tire of seeing overly long sigs, especially when it’s from someone I communicate with frequently. It feels like they’re attaching their resume to every e-mail, and that gets old.

    Here’s what I include on mine:

    Kathy Sena . Writer/Editor
    Specializing in parenting, health, lifestyle and women’s issues
    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
    Phone: 310-XXX-XXXX
    Fax: 310-XXX-XXXX
    Email: kathysena@earthlink.net
    Web: http://www.kathysena.com
    Blog: http://www.parenttalktoday.com (Today we’re talking about keeping too many balls in the air…)

  6. Kathy Sena

    OK, I have no idea how that smiling emoticon ended up on the end of my e-mail sig when I posted this previous comment. I definitely don’t have that on my sig!

    Kathy

  7. Michelle Rafter

    Thanks for the comments Kathy, and the emoticon doesn’t bother me. I have no idea how it got there either.

    I can see why some people want long sigs, but I agree that they could get tedious if you’re exchanging a lot of messages.

    I agree it’s good to change your email sig every once in a while, just for a little variety. It’s kind like an outgoing voice-mail message – if you call someone all the time it’s boring to hear the same old message. Which reminds me, I’d better change my outgoing messages!

    Michelle R.

  8. Promote Me

    I agree that small businesses and craftsmen need to be doing this more to spread the word about themselves.
    Recently launched is a cool new interactive directory which gives everyone the chance to promote themselves. You don’t even have to be a big business to do it.
    If you are looking at spreading the word and getting yourself out there, thats the way to go.

  9. WordCount Q&A: Making new money from old queries « WordCount – Freelancing in the Digital Age

    [...] We started with simple stuff, like the website. We’ve added our e-book reference to our email signatures, which seems like a small thing but we’ve gotten a few people who’ve noticed it from [...]

  10. Paulette Harper Johnson

    Such a great idea. Thanks for sharing

  11. Meryl Evans

    A long signature is dangerous especially with a lot of URLs. If you use more than three URLs (and three is pushing it), some email apps send it to spam. I was using Gmail and had 4 URLs (3 of them social media) — a friend reporter mine went into spam. When I cut it to two, she received it in her inbox.

    Long email signatures can lead to people overlooking it — like we stopped looking at banners — when it’s so long, people ignore it. And with more people getting emails on mobile devices … it can be bothersome.

    Best to limit it to most key info and two links. Create an about.me page that can have all your URLs and social media page.

  12. Eric Wittlake

    If you or your company has a blog, I think it is worth recommending WiseStamp as a way to pull in the most recent post. Particularly if you exchange with the same people frequently, it reflects the constant stream and doesn’t require constant updating.

    (No, I’m not affiliated with Wisestamp at all, I’ve just had a good experience with their offering).

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